StandDesk Review

I just bought a StandDesk and started using it. This is my review (so far).

My last job as a team lead, I was up and walking around quite a bit. Now that I’ve started working from home, I started thinking about all the sitting I’m doing and have gotten rather tired of it. When I was looking for a desk, I had three requirements:

  • Both sitting and standing height (tall enough for a 6’3″ person, don’t care if it’s electric or crank)
  • Very sturdy, even at standing height
  • Something nicer than a laminate top (my old desk was laminate and bubbled up quite a bit)

That said, there are lots of very expensive sit/stand desks out there, and I wanted to stay under $1000, shipping included. There were a few options I came up with, but I settled on the StandDesk. So this is my experience with purchasing the StandDesk, receiving it, unpacking and setting it up.

My desk came in three shipping boxes. One for the frame, one for the crossbar (optional), and one for the desktop . I opted for the black frame with the cable tray and crossbar, and the 60×30 bamboo top.

The box for the frame was very heavy! This might be a bit to carry for some people, so be careful or find a friend to help you. As I opened the frame box, one of the first things I noticed was the feet of the desk. They are heavy, very sturdy, with solid welds. These puppies aren’t coming apart any time soon.

StandDesk Foot Construction is very solid.
StandDesk Foot Construction is very solid.

The main cross-member of the frame, which houses the lift motor, was pretty heavy as well. Construction is solid. The only thing I found wrong with it was a rattle inside my motor housing. It sounded like a screw was loose and rolling around inside. It would have taken a lot of effort to disassemble the frame to get to the inside of this part, so I left it there, hoping it stays out of the way!

The motor assembly had what sounded like a screw loose and rolling around inside it. I didn't take it apart to find out.
The motor assembly had what sounded like a screw loose and rolling around inside it. I didn’t take it apart to find out.

Also, the directions didn’t say anything about the power cable coupler which was inside the frame. Make sure to set it in place and tighten down the plastic nut on the inside!

Make sure to set the power cable in place and screw it down.
Make sure to set the power cable in place and screw it down.

The two telescoping legs were also very solid and well built. I especially liked the curved tubing coming out of the more square tubes in the bottom. One tough spot I found though, was removing the protective plastic caps over the hex shafts sticking out of the top of each leg.

Pulling off hex shaft caps.
The hex shaft caps are a little tough to remove.

You really have to pull hard to get these off, so don’t worry that you might break them when you pull. Just get your fingers around the top lip and pull as hard as you can.

They eventually come off with some effort.
They eventually come off with some effort.

After assembling the legs on the crossbar upside down, you continue assembly by putting the feet on next.

This is a tight fit for the provided hex wrench.
This is a tight fit for the provided hex wrench.

StandDesk provides a really nice, long hex wrench for assembly, and it’s great for most things. However, it was not quite long enough on the short side to really reach the screws down in this hole. So you need to use creative angles to tighten these screws up. Another note is that they provide hex cap screws, split washers, and flat washers for each and every connection! Cheap desks would not provide you those washers for every screw, so this is a real nice to have for tight, sturdy construction that will last and be able to flex with use.

Hold on to it, or it will fall over!
Hold on to it, or it will fall over!

Another thing to note, as you build this frame upside down, when you put the feet on, hold on to it! The frame could easily topple over in this position and you don’t want it landing on your foot or marring your floor!

StandDesk_FootPad

The plastic feet for the floor screw into place and are adjustable. I screwed them in all the way, then counted the rotations I unscrewed them to make sure they were all the same height. After you get all the feet in place, it’s time to flip the whole thing over!

These are a tight fit over the gearboxes.
These are a tight fit over the gearboxes.

Next are the desk supports, to which the desktop will be mounted. These go on solid as well, but they are a tight fit over the gear boxes. I had to press down on the top of the housing as you can see in the picture above, to get the supports to slide into place.

Next for me was the crossbar. I was really glad to have this as an option, because I want my desk to be very sturdy and not have to worry about it being shaky at standing height.

Oh no! When I opened the box for the crossbar, the plastic bag that held the hardware had broken and fallen out all inside the box. I recovered most of the pieces from within the box, but I was still missing 3 of the 4 split washers, so I had to install the crossbar without them.

My hardware pack for my crossbar broke within the box and I was missing some split washers.
My hardware pack for my crossbar broke within the box and I was missing some split washers.

The construction of the crossbar was nice and solid. However, I noticed some rough edges and places where the finish had been scratched or marred.

StandDesk_CrossBar_Rough
Chips out of the paint on the corner.
Scratch across the surface of the crossbar
Scratch across the surface of the crossbar
The crossbar had a few small chips in it in other places as well.
The crossbar had a few small chips in it in other places as well.

Although the chips were a bit of an annoyance, I didn’t worry about it too much, because they probably won’t be visible during any daily use. After getting the crossbar installed, it was on to the cable tray.

On the inside of the cable tray, there were some bumps under the finish. I wonder if this is rust or something else.
On the inside of the cable tray, there were some bumps under the finish. I wonder if this is rust or something else.

I really like this cable tray. It fits the desk perfectly, has plenty of room in it, and it’s solid all the way, unlike the wire cage variety that still look terrible with all the cables hanging about. I did notice some bumps under the finish on my cable tray though. I hope they weren’t rust. But again, these bumps are in a place where no one will notice them.

After that, the frame is complete, and it’s time for the desktop.

For the desktop, I will have to apologize. I failed to take pictures of how the desktop was packed, which was amazingly well. It had pieces of particleboard around the perimeter of the desktop in all directions and was very well and securely padded all the way around. All in all, a great job packing. After placing the top on the frame, bolting it down, and then fastening the lift controls to the underside of the top, it’s all done!

StandDesk_Assembled

What a great looking desk. It really looks nice and I’m proud to have it at the center of my home office.

…but wait! I seem to have some parts left over, and that’s never good, right?

Extra parts, I have no idea what they are for.
Extra parts, I have no idea what they are for.

There are these two foam blocks, and four plastic caps? feet? something. I still to this day have no idea what these parts are for as they are never mentioned in the instructions or anywhere else and it doesn’t look like they would fit anywhere I can find.

StandDesk_Set_Up

At any rate, the desk is all set up and works wonderfully. The motor noise is a dull hum, which is definitely audible, but not overwhelming by any means. I really like the preset buttons which allow me to get up, hit a preset, then walk over to get more coffee while my desk raises or lowers. All in all, this desk has been a great purchase so far and I would recommend it.

Thanks for reading!

–Kevin

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